GEN 1.6  SUMMARY OF NATIONAL REGULATIONS AND INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS/CONVENTIONS

  1. Following is a list of civil aviation legislation, regulations, and associated guidance materials in force in Saudi Arabia. It is essential that anyone engaged in air operations be acquainted with the relevant regulations. Copies of all of these regulatory documents are available on the GACA website at www.gaca.gov.sa.

  2. Foreign registered aircraft intending to operate in Saudi Arabian airspace should take special notice of the Air Transport Regulations (licence to operate), the Aviation Investigation Bureau Regulations (mandatory occurrence reporting), and Parts 1, 91, 99, 127 and 129 of the General Authority of Civil Aviation Regulations (general operating rules, foreign operator authorization and security control of air traffic (SCATANA)).

1.6.1  CIVIL AVIATION LAW

1.6.1.1 The Civil Aviation Law was enacted in 2010 and is the principle legislation governing civil aviation in the Saudi Arabia. The law establishes the General Authority Of Civil Aviation (GACA) as the authority responsible for civil aviation in the Saudi Arabia. The law sets the powers of the authority including the powers to promulgate implementing regulations. The law also contains the crimes and punishments associated with civil aviation in the Saudi Arabia.

1.6.2  General authority of civil aviation regulations (GACAR)

1.6.2.1 In 2016 the GACA introduced a completely new civil aviation safety regulatory framework. The new General Authority of Civil Aviation Regulations (GACAR) are the core implementing regulations of the Civil Aviation Law and they apply to all civil aviation activities in the Saudi Arabia. The GACARs are organized according to chapters and parts. Chapters address broad subject areas of the regulation and the individual parts within the chapters address in more detail, specific subject areas of regulation. The table of contents of the GACAR is presented below.

CHAPTER A – GENERAL PROVISIONS

  • PART 1 – DEFINITIONS, ABBREVIATIONS AND EDITORIAL CONVENTIONS

  • PART 2 — UNITS OF MEASUREMENT TO BE USED IN AIR AND GROUND OPERATIONS

  • PART 3 – FALSE AND MISLEADING STATEMENTS

  • PART 5 – SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

  • PART 7 – PROBLEMATIC USE OF PSYCHOACTIVE SUBSTANCES; PREVENTION AND SAFETY PROGRAMS

  • PART 9 – AIRCRAFT UNDER AN AGREEMENT FOR TRANSFER OF FUNCTIONS AND DUTIES IN ACCORDANCE WITH ARTICLE 83bis OF THE CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL CIVIL AVIATION

CHAPTER B – PROCEDURAL RULES

  • PART 11 – GENERAL RULEMAKING PROCEDURES

  • PART 13 – COMPLIANCE ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES, PETITIONS FOR RECONSIDERATION, AND APPEALS

CHAPTER C – AIRCRAFT

  • PART 21 – CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND ARTICLES

  • PART 23 - Airworthiness Standards: Normal, Utility, Acrobatic, and Commuter Category AirplaneS

  • PART 25 – AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES

  • PART 26 – CONTINUED AIRWORTHINESS AND SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS FOR TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES

  • PART 27 - Airworthiness Standards: Normal Category Rotorcraft

  • PART 29 - Airworthiness Standards: Transport Category Rotorcraft

  • PART 31 - Airworthiness Standards: Manned Free Balloons

  • PART 33 - Airworthiness Standards: Aircraft Engines

  • PART 34 – FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIRMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRCRAFT

  • PART 35 - Airworthiness Standards: Propellers

  • PART 36 – NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION

  • PART 39 – AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

  • PART 43 – MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND ALTERATION

  • PART 45 – IDENTIFICATION AND REGISTRATION MARKING

  • PART 47 – AIRCRAFT REGISTRATION

  • PART 49 – RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS

CHAPTER D – AIRMEN

  • PART 60 – FLIGHT SIMULATION TRAINING DEVICES AND AVIATION TRAINING DEVICES

  • PART 61 - Certification: Pilots, Flight Engineers, Flight Instructors, and Ground Instructors

  • PART 64 - Certification: Air Traffic Controllers

  • PART 65 - Certification: Dispatchers and Cabin Crew Members

  • PART 66 - Certification: Mechanics and Repairmen

  • PART 67 - Medical Standards and Certification

CHAPTER E – AIRSPACE

  • PART 71 – DESIGNATED AIRSPACE, ROUTES, POINTS AND MINIMUM IFR ALTITUDES

  • PART 77 – SAFE, EFFICIENT USE AND PRESERVATION OF THE NAVIGABLE AIRSPACE

CHAPTER F – GENERAL OPERATING RULES

  • PART 91 - General Operating and Flight Rules

  • PART 93 – SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES

  • PART 97 – INSTRUMENT FLIGHT PROCEDURES

  • PART 99 – SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC

  • PART 101 – UNMANNED BALLOONS, KITES, AMATEUR ROCKETS, MODEL AIRCRAFT, AND UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS

  • PART 103 – ULTRALIGHT VEHICLES

  • PART 105 – PARACHUTE OPERATIONS

  • PART 109 – TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS BY AIR

CHAPTER G – AIR OPERATORS

  • PART 117 – Flight and Duty Time Limitations and Rest Requirements: Flight Crew Members

  • PART 119 – CERTIFICATION: SAUDI ARABIAN COMMERCIAL AND NONCOMMERCIAL OPERATORS

  • PART 121 - Operations: Commercial Air Operators Operating Transport Category Aircraft or Commuter Category Airplanes

  • PART 125 – OPERATIONS: NONCOMMERCIAL OPERATORS USING TURBOJETS, TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRCRAFT, OR COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES

  • PART 127 – OPERATIONS: Noncommercial Foreign Operators with an Operating Base in the Saudi Arabia

  • PART 129 – OPERATIONS: FOREIGN AIR CARRIERS

  • PART 133 – AERIAL WORK OPERATIONS

  • PART 135 – OPERATIONS: COMMERCIAL AIR OPERATORS OPERATING OTHER THAN TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRCRAFT OR COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES

CHAPTER H – AERODROMES

  • PART 139 – CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS: AERODROMES

CHAPTER I – AIR AGENCIES

  • PART 141 – PILOT SCHOOLS

  • PART 142 – TRAINING CENTERS

  • PART 143 – FLIGHT ENGINEER, CABIN CREW MEMBER, AND AIRCRAFT DISPATCHER TRAINING SCHOOLS

  • PART 144 – AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLER SCHOOLS

  • PART 145 – REPAIR STATIONS

  • PART 147 – AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN SCHOOLS

  • PART 149 – AVIATION CLUBS

CHAPTER J – AIR NAVIGATION SERVICES

  • PART 170 - Certification: Air Navigation Service Providers

  • PART 171 – AIR TRAFFIC SERVICES

  • PART 172 – INSTRUMENT FLIGHT PROCEDURE SERVICES

  • PART 173 – AERONAUTICAL TELECOMMUNICATION SERVICES

  • PART 175 – AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

  • PART 179 – METEOROLOGY SERVICES FOR AIR NAVIGATION

CHAPTER K – ADMINISTRATIVE RULES

  • PART 183 – REPRESENTATIVES OF THE PRESIDENT

  • PART 193 – PROTECTION OF SUBMITTED SAFETY DATA AND SAFETY INFORMATION

  • PART 199 – REPEALS, COMING INTO FORCE AND TRANSITIONAL PROVISIONS

1.6.3  COMPANION REGULATIONS

1.6.3.1 Other regulations related to the GACAR that should also be consulted include:
  1. Implementing Regulations for the Civil Aviation Tariff Act (GACA)

  2. Air Transport Regulations (GACA) (formerly titled the Economic Regulations)

  3. Consumer Protection Regulations (GACA)

  4. Security Regulations (GACA)

  5. Facilitation Regulations (GACA)

  6. Aviation Investigation Bureau (AIB)

1.6.4  Related Publications

1.6.4.1 The KSA regulations are complemented by several additional publications. Those that are published by, or on behalf of, the General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA), may be obtained on the GACA website at www.gaca.gov.sa and those that are published by ICAO and other Stated can be obtained directly from those authorities. The following related publications are worthy of special mention:
  1. Saudi Arabia State Safety Policy Statement.

  2. Saudi Arabia Aeronautic Information Publication (AIP) published by the GACA.

  3. Avisory Circlars published by the GACA.

  4. Other regulatory standards incorporated by reference (ICAO, FAA, other)

1.6.5  SCATANA Regulations GACAR PART 99

1.6.5.1 A plan called the Security Control of Air Traffic and Air Navigation Aids (SCATANA), has been developed to ensure that, should hostilities break out in whole of Saudi Arabian airspace or part thereof, all civilian aircraft in flight within affected sector(s) shall be quickly notified of the circumstances and given special instructions to immediately vacate or avoid those areas considered to be hazardous.
1.6.5.2 In cases where the safety of a flight may be in dire jeopardy, the aircraft shall be instructed to land as soon as possible at the nearest aerodrome suitable to the pilot.
1.6.5.3 Once the JEDDAH ACC has been informed by the Air Defence Notification Center (ADNC) that the following SCATANA rules have been activated, all ATS units in Saudi Arabia shall broadcast on all available frequencies that, "SCATANA RULES ARE NOW ACTIVE, ALL AIRCRAFT STAND BY FOR SCATANA INSTRUCTIONS", and then, under the direction of ADNC, the appropriate ATS unit shall relay specific SCATANA instructions to each aircraft.
1.6.5.4 At the same time, using all available means, voice circuits, aircraft relay, ATIS, HFRT, AFS (DD message), TLX, facsimile, PTT commercial service, etc.

The ACC shall notify:

  1. All ATS units, adjacent and world-wide, and all other aerodrome agencies in Saudi Arabia, that SCATANA rules have been activated and that Saudi Arabian airspace or part(s) there of is /are closed to all traffic until further notice.

  2. All aircraft operators in Saudi Arabia that SCATANA rules have been activated and to inform all of their aircraft in flight to contact ATC immediately for appropriate SCATANA instructions and for those aircraft not yet airborne, to remain on the ground.

  3. The GACA / SANS / AIM NOTAM office to issue the appropriate NOTAM.

1.6.5.5 SCATANA rules:
  1. The rules of the Security Control of Air Traffic and Air Navigation Aids (SCATANA) Plan will only be activated in times of war or during a defence emergency and restrictions to aircraft movements will not be imposed for any greater time or degree than is necessary to meet military tactical requirements.

  2. While SCATANA rules are activated, they shall apply to all aircraft flying in or about to enter Saudi Arabian airspace.

  3. The pilot-in-command of an aircraft entering or operating in Saudi Arabian airspace, once notified that SCATANA rules have been activated, shall comply with all SCATANA instructions to change course, altitude or flight level or to land at the nearest suitable aerodrome acceptable to the pilot.

  4. After SCATANA rules have been activated, ADNC shall assign all proposed flights a Wartime Air Traffic Priority Number based on the flight's purpose, route of flight and the level of necessity for the flight to be flown.

Note: When whole or affected part(s) of Saudi Arabian airspace has been cleared of civilian aircraft, it can be expected to rapidly follow that many, if not all, of the Saudi Arabian air navigational aids serving aerodromes on affected sector(s) will be shut down.

While SCATANA rules are active, all proposed flight operations in affected sector(s) of Saudi Arabian airspace will require approval by ADNC and be assigned an appropriate Wartime Air Traffic Priority Number.

ADNC shall determine which Wartime Air Traffic Priority Numbers are permitted to fly in affected sector(s) based on the level of hostilities, existing or expected, along the aircraft's intended route of flight.

1.6.6  INSTRUCTIONS TO BE FOLLOWED IN THE EVENT OF AN AVIATION ACCIDENT OR OCCURRENCE IN SAUDI ARABIA

Pilots and all concerned are hereby required to adhere to the following instructions in the event of a reportable aviation occurrence in Saudi Arabia.

1.6.6.1  Reportable aviation occurrences
1.6.6.1.1 Occurrences that require mandatory notification to the Aviation Investigation Bureau (AIB) are as follows:
  1. all aircraft accidents (see paragraph 1.6.6.1.2);

  2. engine failures:

    1. single engine aircraft: all failures;

    2. multi engine aircraft:

      1. failure of more than one engine;

      2. failures which are not confined to the powerplant proper;

        Note: compressor blade and turbine bucket failures are not normally reportable.

  3. Fires which occur in flight including those engine fires which are not contained in the engine, i.e. resulting in fire damage to other aircraft components;

  4. Occurrences which result in danger of collision or actual collision with terrain or obstacles;

  5. Occurrences of any nature which caused difficulties in controlling the aircraft such as aircraft system failures, weather phenomena and operation outside the approved flight envelope;

  6. Take-off and landing problems including undershooting, overrunning, running off the side of runways, wheels-up landing, landing at the wrong aerodrome and abandoning take off after take off thrust has been set;

  7. Inability of any required flight crew member to perform his prescribed flight duties as a result of reduced medical fitness;

  8. Decompression resulting in an emergency descent;

  9. Near collisions and other hazardous air traffic incidents including faulty procedures or equipment failures;

  10. Collision made between aircraft, loading bridges, fuel trucks, mobile lounges, service trucks, other equipment or damage caused by jet blast when no contact is made;

  11. Detachment of any aircraft part, during taxi, take-off, flight, or loading;

  12. Observation of a lightning strike or discovery or resultant damage;

  13. The indication of a bird strike regardless of residual evidence;

  14. Significant load sheet discrepancy, load insecurity, fumes, container leakage, or aircraft damage caused by cargo or baggage;

  15. Total failure or loss of door, window or hatch;

  16. Fuel inadequacy, fuel imbalance, or the incorrect quantity or type of fuel is loaded; and

  17. Foreign object damage resulting in engine change or significant structural damage.

1.6.6.1.2 An aircraft accident is an aviation occurrence which, at any time during the period commencing when the first person boards an aircraft for the purpose of flight and ending when the last person disembarks from the aircraft after the flight, results in:
  1. a person, other than a stowaway, sustains a serious (see paragraph 1.6.6.1.3) or fatal injury that is not self-inflicted, inflicted by another person or caused by natural causes, as a result of that person:

    1. being in the aircraft;

    2. coming into direct contact with any part of the aircraft, including any part that may have become detached from the aircraft; or

    3. being directly exposed to the jet blast of the aircraft.

  2. the aircraft sustains damage or structural failure which adversely affects the structural strength, performance or flight characteristics of the aircraft and normally requiring major repair or replacement of any affected component part, other than damage or failure that is limited to:

    1. the engine its cowling or its accessories;

    2. propellers, wing tips, antennas, tires, brakes or fairing; and

    3. small dents or puncture holes in the aircraft skin;

  3. the aircraft is missing or is completely inaccessible; and

  4. all cases of forced landings off aerodrome irrespective of injuries or damage.

1.6.6.1.3 A serious injury is an injury sustained by a person in an accident which:
  1. requires hospitalization for more than 48 hours, commencing within seven days from the date the injury was sustained;

  2. results in fracture of any bone, other than a simple fracture of the nose or of any fingers or toes;

  3. involves lacerations which cause severe hemorrhage, nerve, muscle or tendon damage;

  4. involves injury to any internal organ;

  5. involves second or third degree burns, or any burns affecting more than five percent of the body surface; or

  6. involves verified exposure to infectious substances or injurious radiation.

1.6.6.2  Notification of reportable aviation occurrences
1.6.6.2.1 Pilots-in-command involved in reportable occurrences or persons they may delegate, shall immediately notify the fact to nearest government aerodrome, the nearest police station, and the Aviation Investigation Bureau (AIB), AIB Duty Investigator - telephone number24 hours daily is + 966 (0) 12 685 6551 (international) or 012 685 6551 (domestic).

Aviation Investigation Bureau of Saudi Arabia Facsimile numbers (24 hours) are: Fax:+966 12 685 4250 Email contact is report@aib.gov.sa

1.6.6.2.2 This notification is required notwithstanding any previous notification which might have been sent prior to the occurrence.
1.6.6.2.3 The required notification shall be affected by the quickest available means of telecommunication or transport and shall include:
  1. Nationality, type, model and registration marks of the aircraft.

  2. Place of the occurrence.

  3. Date and time of the occurrence.

  4. Number of persons on board.

  5. Nature of the occurrence and extent of damage, if any.

  6. Number of persons killed or injured, names if known.

  7. Name of the aircraft owner / operator.

  8. Name of the pilot-in-command.

1.6.6.2.4 Aerodromes or air traffic control units receiving an occurrence notification are required to immediately forward the information to the Aviation Investigation Bureau (AIB). by facsimile at + 966 12 685 4250 or e-mail report@aib.gov.sa
1.6.6.3  Post notification
1.6.6.3.1 The aircraft shall not be touched or any parts removed before an investigation by the appropriate authorities into the cause of the occurrence has taken place, except when deemed necessary for the rescue of human life or protection of property.
1.6.6.3.2 The pilot-in-command shall take every possible measure to prevent any person from tampering with the aircraft, its wreckage, traces of the occurrence or any parts thereof.
1.6.6.3.3 Unless he is forced by the requirements of paragraph 1.6.6.1, personal injury or other urgent circumstances, the pilot-in-command shall not leave the scene of the occurrence without first ensuring a guard has been placed by the police.
1.6.6.3.4 The pilot-in-command shall, as soon as possible, file with the nearest aerodrome director a written report about the occurrence, its cause, circumstances, damages, injuries, all relevant details, and means for further contact by an investigation team. In the case of an occurrence occurring at an aerodrome, flight crews must not leave the aerodrome before submitting such report.

Note: If any reportable occurrence occurs to an aircraft registered in Saudi Arabia outside its territory, the pilot-in-command shall immediately notify the Aviation Investigation Bureau of Saudi Arabia and Saudi Arabia Consulate concerned.

1.6.6.3.5 The notification shall be as detailed in paragraph 1.6.6.2.3 above.
1.6.6.3.6 He shall also send, as soon as possible, a written report detailed as paragraph 1.6.6.3.4 to the Aviation Investigation Bureau of Saudi Arabia.
1.6.6.4  Removal of the aircraft

The aircraft, its wreckage or debris shall not be removed without the permission of the Aviation Investigation Bureau of Saudi Arabia.

1.6.6.5  Aviation occurrence investigation procedures implemented in Saudi Arabia

Attention of all concerned is drawn to the following procedures, in addition to those indicated in Annex 13 ICAO Standards, which will be applicable for aviation occurrence investigation in Saudi Arabia:

1.6.6.5.1  the Aviation Investigation Bureau of Saudi Arabiais the authority responsible for the investigation of all aviation occurrences involving civil aircraft within the sovereign and territorial waters of Saudi Arabia.
1.6.6.5.2 The Commanding General of the Royal Saudi Airforce is the authority responsible for the investigation of aviation occurrences involving only military aircraft within the sovereign area and territorial waters of Saudi Arabia. When the occurrence involves civil air traffic control services, airways facilities or Aerodromes, the Aviation Investigation Bureau of Saudi Arabia will be represented.